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David Hume, Of Superstition and Enthusiasm, 1741

Category: Philosophy » David Hume | Views: 8 |

Author:   David Hume
Headline:   Of Superstition and Enthusiasm, 1741
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

Editor's note: "Of Superstition and Enthusiasm" appeared in 1741 in the first volume of Hume's Essays, Moral and Political. The text file here is based on the 1875 Green and Grose edition. Spelling and punctuation have been modernized.


David Hume, Of the Delicacy of Taste and Passion, 1741

Category: Philosophy » David Hume | Views: 6 |

Author:   David Hume
Headline:   Of the Delicacy of Taste and Passion, 1741
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

Copyright 1995, James Fieser (jfieser@utm.edu). See end note for details on copyright and editing conventions. This is a working draft; please report errors.[1]


David Hume, Of the Liberty of the Press, 1741

Category: Philosophy » David Hume | Views: 8 |

Author:   David Hume
Headline:   Of the Liberty of the Press, 1741
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

Editor's note: "Of the Liberty of the Press" appeared in 1741 in Volume one of Hume's Essays, Moral and Political. The text file here is based on the 1777 edition of Hume's Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects. Spelling and punctuation have not been modernized.


Epicurus, Letter to Menoeceus

Category: Philosophy » Epictetus | Views: 7 |

Author:   Epicurus
Headline:   Letter to Menoeceus
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

Greeting.
Let no one be slow to seek wisdom when he is young nor weary in the search thereof when he is grown old. For no age is too early or too late for the health of the soul. And to say that the season for studying philosophy has not yet come, or that it is past and gone, is like saying that the season for happiness is not yet or that it is now no more. Therefore, both old and young ought to seek wisdom, the former in order that, as age comes over him, he may be young in good things because of the grace of what has been, and the latter in order that, while he is young, he may at the same time be old, because he has no fear of the things which are to come. So we must exercise ourselves in the things which bring happiness, since, if that be present, we have everything, and, if that be absent, all our actions are directed toward attaining it.


ESSAYS. Second Series, by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Category: Philosophy » Ralph Waldo Emerson | Views: 82 |

Author:   Ralph Waldo Emerson
Headline:   ESSAYS. Second Series
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

THE POET
A moody child and wildly wise Pursued the game with joyful eyes, Which chose, like meteors, their way, And rived the dark with private ray: They overleapt the horizon's edge, Searched with Apollo's privilege; Through man, and woman, and sea, and star, Saw the dance of nature forward far; Through worlds, and races, and terms, and times, Saw musical order, and pairing rhymes.
Olympian bards who sung Divine ideas below, Which always find us young, And always keep us so.


George Berkeley, A TREATISE CONCERNING THE PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE, 1710

Category: Philosophy » George Berkeley | Views: 15 |

Author:   George Berkeley
Headline:   A TREATISE CONCERNING THE PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE
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Language:   English

TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE
THOMAS, EARL OF PEMBROKE, &c.,
KNIGHT OF THE MOST NOBLE ORDER OF THE GARTER AND ONE OF THE LORDS OF HER MAJESTY'S MOST MONOURABLE PRIVY COUNCIL

MY LORD,
You will perhaps wonder that an obscure person, who has not the honour to be known to your lordship, should presume to address you in this manner. But that a man who has written something with a design to promote Useful Knowledge and Religion in the world should make choice of your lordship for his patron, will not be thought strange by any one that is not altogether unacquainted with the present state of the church ...


George Berkeley, Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, 1713

Category: Philosophy » George Berkeley | Views: 13 |

Author:   George Berkeley
Headline:   Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

Three Dialogues?THREE DIALOGUES
Between
HYLAS AND PHILONOUS
The Design of which is Plainly to Demonstrate the Reality and Perfection of
HUMAN KNOWLEDGE
The Incorporeal Nature of the
SOUL
And the Immediate Providence of a
DEITY
In Opposition to
SCEPTICS AND ATHEISTS
Also to Open a Method for Rendering the Sciences More Easy, Useful, and CompendiousBetween Hylas and Philonous


Ralph Waldo Emerson, ESSAYS. First Series

Category: Philosophy » Ralph Waldo Emerson | Views: 90 |

Author:   Ralph Waldo Emerson
Headline:   Ralph Waldo Emerson, ESSAYS. First Series,
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Language:   English

HISTORY - There is no great and no small To the Soul that maketh all: And where it cometh, all things are; And it cometh everywhere.


Ralph Waldo Emerson, THE TRANSCENDENTALIST. A Lecture read at the Masonic Temple, Boston, January, 1842

Category: Philosophy » Ralph Waldo Emerson | Views: 16 |

Author:   Ralph Waldo Emerson
Headline:   THE TRANSCENDENTALIST. A Lecture read at the Masonic Temple, Boston, January, 1842
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

The first thing we have to say respecting what are called _new views_ here in New England, at the present time, is, that they are not new, but the very oldest of thoughts cast into the mould of these new times. The light is always identical in its composition, but it falls on a great variety of objects, and by so falling is first revealed to us, not in its own form, for it is formless, but in theirs; in like manner, thought only appears in the objects it classifies...


Rene Descartes, Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting the Reason, and Seeking Truth in the Sciences

Category: Philosophy » Descartes Rene | Views: 67 |

Author:   Rene Descartes
Headline:   Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting the Reason, and Seeking Truth in the Sciences
Format:   HTML
Language:   English

This work is one of the most influential in history. The famous phrase, "COGITO ERGO SUM" (I think, therefore I am) is a central theme. Descartes' beliefs on that dual nature of mind and body, and his emphasis on the role of doubt in all inquiry, formed the basis for centuries of science and social thought.

This etext was created by Ilana and Greg Newby. They used a Mac IIci and Apple One Flatbed Scanner donated by Apple. Caere text scanning and character recognition software (OmniPage) was used. Greg is a professor in the U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the Grad. School of Library and Information Science. Ilana is a reference librarian at the Urbana Free Library. Thanks to Apple and Caere for their donations and to the Computer Service Office of the University of Illinois for their unofficial support.



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